The Amazing Earls Court Exhibition Centre and the company that wants to destroy it

Earls Court Exhibition Hall

Earls Court Exhibition Hall

Exit Earls Court station at the Warwick Road, and an unfeasibly large frontage opposite gently curves across your field of vision. Of course, this is the main entrance of Earls Court Exhibition Centre. It has welcomed somewhere between 1.5 and 2.5 million people annually for decades. No other venue anywhere, ever, has accumulated anything like the diverse history it has for musical performance, popular domestic exhibitions, military display, and political showcasing. It has hosted some of the twentieth century’s greatest individuals. And what’s more, it’s unique architecture is the work of one of America’s most accomplished inter-war architects.

A developer called Capco (full name Capital & Counties, operating through EC Properties, a vehicle valued at £934 million in 2013) wants it totally obliterated for luxury housing. London does need homes badly, but schemes like this are about attracting foreign slush money. It’s insane.

Earls Court Exhibition Centre is worth saving. Here’s why:

The Biggest Big Time of All

Yuri Gagarin

Yuri Gagarin

On 11th July 1961, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin entered Earls Court exhibition hall with a bouquet of flowers, and seduced the British public. All the papers were there, and the crowds were massive- it was almost like a foretaste of how Beatlemania gripped Britain two years later! Just three months before, Gagarin had sat in the tin can of Vostok 1 and became the first human in space. He had a lot more room at the main hall of Earls Court Exhibition Centre- it was the largest enclosed space in London.

The Soviet Exhibition 1968 (source EC&O Venue Libraries)

The Soviet Exhibition 1968 (source EC&O Venue Libraries)

The Soviets were back with showcase propoganda exhibitions in 1968 and 1979, but without the magic of Gagarin. Nevertheless, many other charismatic celebrities drew fans to Earls Court. Muhammad Ali defended his world heavyweight title against Brian London there in 1966. In 1981, Vivienne Westwood staged her first catwalk there (and the models wore cutting edge consumer tech: Sony Walkmans). Not everyone who commanded crowds at Earls Court was a hero. Oswald Mosley held a rally of British Fascists here in 1939.

An amazing roll-call of music’s mega-names have staged some of the greatest gigs ever at Earls Court: Led Zeppelin, David Bowie, The Rolling Stones, Queen, Pink Floyd, George Michael, Radiohead, Madonna, deadmau5, the Arctic Monkeys, Arcade Fire… there’s many more!

And of course, there have been the exhibitions. With a capacity up to 20,000, Earls Court has been the place to have it large since 1937, when it opened with the Chocolate and Confectionary Show. The Motor Show, Boat Show, Great British Beer Festival, and BRIT Awards have all been regular annual Earls Court events. The Royal Tournament returned to Earls Court as the British Military Tournament, and the Ideal Home Show ran right up to this year, 2014.

Astonishing Architecture 

Almost finished! Earls Court Exhibition Hall plus sheds

Almost finished! Earls Court Exhibition Hall plus sheds, 1937

Leveque Tower (1927)  in Columbus, Ohio was designed by C Howard Crane

Leveque Tower, Columbus, Ohio: also C Howard Crane

Earls Court’s architect was C Howard Crane of Detroit, who left a coast-to-coast string of great theatres across the US (and with others, he worked on New York’s Radio City Music Hall). For Columbus, Ohio, he designed the magnificent 169m-tall Leveque Tower (1927), the tallest Art Deco skyscraper between New York and Chicago. He moved to London in 1930 and the masterpieces kept coming. His Gaumont (now Odeon) Holloway Road (1938) is listed. Crane’s style spanned from Beaux-Arts Neo-classical to Modernist. Earls Court Exhibition Hall is his most stripped-back, clean-finished design, and his largest. 

C Howard Crane (source HistoricDetroit.org)

C Howard Crane (source HistoricDetroit.org)

The architectural style is sometimes called Art Moderne, related to Art Deco but stripped of jazzy design elements and stressing the horizontal rather than vertical. Even so, Earls Court’s five vertical window strips, which climb the curving sweep of a grooved façade, echo window strips in American skyscrapers like the Empire State Building and Rockerfeller Centre.

The vital heroic activities of Earls Court

The vital heroic activities of Earls Court

Above them, five heroic square reliefs, by sculptor David Evans, depict such vital fields as Clockwork, Music, Jousting, Sports and Horticulture, in red and white. The red neon letters EARLS COURT may be the biggest in the UK, and certainly rank with CENTRE POINT’s white neon in size and iconic status. 

Transport for London map honours Earls Court with a cool isometric schematic

Transport for London map honours Earls Court with a cool isometric schematic

A miracle of concrete and steel engineering, Earls Court Exhibition Centre was built over London Underground’s District Line in just two years. Steel trusses reach 87m clear across the auditorium.  The roof, pitched like a humungous white tent, looks like the work of giants.

A heroic, humungous form

A heroic, humungous form

In many ways it was. This whole structure is simply heroic.

 

Time to Stop Capco

Staggeringly, the local authority, the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, is completely oblivious to the heritage of Earls Court. Like the developers Capco, they want no trace of Earls Court Exhibition Centre left.

This has been about the history of Earls Court Exhibition Hall, but the issue is also about the local people and businesses. Capco’s plans demonstrate contempt for the local heritage, people, and businesses of Earls Court. Maybe we can stop Capco and save Earls Court’s estimated £1 billion of annual business for London. There’s a small window of opportunity because the adjacent borough, Hammersmith and Fulham, have thrown out Capco’s wider plan which extends westwards. On 27th August 2014 demolition applications are considered. 

Check out the campaign at http://www.saveearlscourt.com

And there’s petitions to sign right here:

https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/save-earl-s-court

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/56270

As Gagarin said on the launch pad: Poyekhali! (Let’s Go!)

 

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About herbertwright

I am a London-based writer interested in art, architecture, the future and more. I am the author of three non-fiction books. Published articles online appear on www.herbertwright.co.uk.
This entry was posted in Architecture, London and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The Amazing Earls Court Exhibition Centre and the company that wants to destroy it

  1. Hammersmith person says:

    Load of nonsense. The Council Tax payers of Hammersmith and Fulam will greatly benefit from this development. It’s about time the estate residents though about this rather than selfishly always thinking about themselves!

    • This comment is typical of the uncaring constituency who are destroying London.
      ‘Hammersmith person’ (no name given, I note): you rather give the game away when you identify your own concern as a Council Tax payer. Actually, so am I, but I care about a lot more than my Council Tax bill.
      Specifically, the heritage of Earls Court, the business it generates for the area, and the residents affected.
      Yes, I touch briefly on the estate residents on the H&F in my blog as well- how extraordinary that you of all people accuse them of only thinking for themselves. Perhaps you want them socially cleansed by setting ‘affordable rents’ that are impossible to pay for most working people?
      Terry Farrel’s masterplan has many good aspects but it is simply wrong to pay the price of losing this fantastic asset and is being used as a vehicle to exploit the high-end international property buyer at the expense of locals.
      Argument and logic are absent in your comment. You have failed to address any of the issues raised, and your attitude is a disgrace. Perhaps that is why you wish to remain anonymous.

  2. Matteo says:

    The Earls court Exhibition centre demolition: I can hear the song “money” in background…
    I think this is how power and profits wins against culture.
    Every time I visit London, I like to stay overnight in the Earls Court district, because of the exhibition centre. It will never be the same. It’s sad to see a piece of history demolished. I think you English friends have lost a very important place…

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